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, our senior medical correspondent, elizabeth cohen is in ft. worth, texas, and she's been tracking all three of these illnesses. i want to start with the most serious and the one creating the most headlines, this flu. so, we are seeing this slowdown that i just mentioned but the numbers are still high. put it in perspective for me, if you can today, elizabeth. >> reporter: do you know what, ashleigh, if you look overall at the whole country, the numbers have gone down slightly, the amount of flu activity. however, do you know what, you really don't care what the flu's like halfway across the country, you care about what it's like where you live. so, in some parts of the country particularly the southeast, the numbers are going down. in other parts they're going up. this is very classic of a flu season. these numbers kind of go up and down. but, you know, what we're hoping is that this is sort of the beginning of flu overall going down. still lots of flu out there. still get a vaccine if you haven't gotten one already. >> is this sort of not, you know, overstated about getting the vacci
, and welcome to millionaire. with $40,000 and smiling from ear to ear is marisa cohen who knows that with that money, she can finally get her dream kitchen. something you've been wanting for a while, huh? >> yes. >> so tell me about that. >> well, i live in manhattan, so i have a typical small manhattan kitchen, and, you know, by the time you put the toaster oven and the microwave and my husband's teas and the peanut butter, there's this much room for me to cook. so i actually, at a recent silent auction, i won a consultation with an architect to, you know, redo our kitchen, but my husband, jeremy, said to me, "well, where are you gonna get the money to do it? go on millionaire." so-- >> is that how this happened? >> one of the ways. that and my children harassing me every time i yelled at the television. >> well, then we better get that kitchen for you. >> yeah, so... >> no question about it. so let's recap where you are. okay, you're still taking on round 1. so far, you have banked $40,000. >> whew, yay. >> you're 10 away from the million. you have one lifeline remaining. >> o
to castro and his perspective on it. we have congressman steve cohen on the show. he's going to talk about gun control. and then you know now alex jones jones, he attacked the "the young turks." >> jennifer: i hope you have invited him on. >> cenk: we have. we'll see how that turns out. >> jennifer: i could not believe that a man who is allowed to have weapons if you saw that particular explosion. i felt sorry for poor pierce morgan. on your show, the issue of gun control, you're going to be talking about it, but do you think, cenk, you, that we can actually stoke congress to do something? do you have confidence that we might be able to shame them? >> cenk: you know, it's really interesting. we talked to congressman yarmouth on the show, and he thinks we can get it done. but congressman cohen is more skeptical. every day that goes by we get further away from bogey able to do it. i have to give the obama administration credit, they're considering really strong proposals. i'm hopeful. >> jennifer: cheng uygur hopeful on gun safety measures, i'm feeling good about it. that's all i can say. w
. it seems unbelievable. if it seems such, it just may be. elizabeth cohen joins me live to answer to this miracle. you know, i thought this might be a first-time thing. but it's happened a few times before. double arm transplants. how do they do it? it seems so intricate. >> they have to reconnect everything. you can imagine, this is surgery done at times with a microstop. you're reconnecting -- microscope. you're reconnecting every muscle, every tendon, every nerve. and you're connecting blood vessels. if that limb doesn't get blood, that limb will die. i was just on the phone with a surgeon who's done these before. he said that is the part that really makes you sweat is when you have to put that circulatory system back together. so okay oh is the seventh person -- marrocco is the seventh person to have this double arm transplant. the surgeon told me the biggest part of success is what part of the arm the transplant is done. the closer to the wrist the better. in simple terms, the more of the arm you have to transplant, the more difficult the task is. and brendan's actually, it's
. sanjay gupta is in atlanta. what are you expecting to hear? >> elizabeth cohen has been working through the night on getting these numbers. one number, which is important and what we expected. widespread outbreak of the flu. 47 states, up from 41 states with an outbreak of the flu. some good news. the number of states with high levels of activity has gone down from 29 now to 24. two additional deaths in young people, from 18 to 20. but there may be some relief as you say in sight. we are at epidemic threshold. that basically means we are seeing more cases than we expected to see at this time year. big question? will those cases stay elevated or will they start to come down across the country? >> we keep hearing, get a flu shot, get a flu shot. some got our flu shots early. yes, i'm gloating. if you haven't gotten your flu shot yet, is there enough vaccine? >> i think so. i crunched some numbers on this overnight. may be some spot shortages, but general numbers, take aook at how many of these vaccines were specifically manufactured, 135 million, bottom number, 112 million vaccinated. not
elizabeth cohen has been following up on this. i'm at an absolute loss. >> it's so hard to be those parents. so hard. you know, the american academy of pediatrics is officially against it. we reached out to autism speaks which is a big advocacy group which is big on autism and their families. they say there is currently no adequate scientific evidence to advocate the use of medical marijua marijuana. they're saying there's this family who's saying they had a good experience, other families who say they've had a good thing. >> other families. how many? is there a group? have they found each other? are they able to lobby? hey, listen. when there are controversial drugs being tested, and you're in fear of dying, you do anything. regardless of what the government says krks which is mann will continue to be a. >> right, so these families have found each other. the eckecles family did it. they're scattered, downline, talking to each other online. i don't think there's a formal lobby or anything. so they live in a state where marijuana is league, then they do what this family did and they try to s
identify whether or not they have this thing. elizabeth cohen in atlanta. why is this one so nasty this time around, elizabeth? >> soledad, it is the perfect storm for this particular stomach bug. so let's go over the three things that make this one really bad. first of all this particular strain, so new, it's called the sydney 2012. first spotted in sydney just last year, we're not immune to it. our bodies haven't seen it before. it comes on full force. highly contagious. just need one or two particles of this virus to get you sick. and a lot of people get this illness, they are contagious, but symptom free. they are not sick. running around making the rest of us sick. >> so disgusting. you know how i feel about those people. elizabeth cohen, thank you. listen, she and i agree on the purell thing. >>> the southeast getting a dose of the deep freeze with snow, freezing rain and dangerous ice expected from the carolinas to tennessee. even farther south. drivers in nashville, told don't travel if you don't have to. out west, the rare sight of freezing rain forced the runways at salt
prohibited abortions except to save the mother's life. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen returned to the state where it all began and spoke to both sides. >> reporter: roe v. wade originated in texas and 40 years later the situation here and in much of the u.s. is complex. on the one hand the governor has made this vow. >> my goal and the goal of many of those joining me here today is to make abortion at any stage a thing of the past. >> reporter: on the other hand, this is the reality. it's elizabeth at cnn. >> come on in. >> reporter: i'm at a health clinic in austin where seven women will have abortions today. >> do we have anymore all t ultrasounds? >> i don't think so. >> reporter: she offers a care that includes providing abortions to 9,000 women a year. >> my main goal is to provide an oasis where she feels safe and at peace. >> reporter: 72,470 women received abortions in 2011. in the u.s., nearly one in three women will have an abortion before the age of 45 according to the nonpartisan guttmacher institute. you have a lot more work to do? >> we have a lot more work to do
virus that has some awful symptoms. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen is here with us. what is this sydney 2012? >> sydney 2012 is a strain of something called norovirus, which a lot of people call smum fl stomach flu, not the right terminology, but icky for want of a better phrase. we're talking about forceful vomiting. we're talking diarrhea. it is really not pleasant. >> yeah. something you don't want to go to work with. nobody wants this. how do we stop this from coming into our bodys? >> you know, to some extent you can't. it is incredibly contagious. if you're sick now and god forbid you were vomiting, i would be in real trouble. wash your hands a lot with soap and water. you can use an alcohol-based sterilizer but you should be doing soap and water. wash down surfaces and remember that even after you're better, you can still be contagious. and so don't cook for other people for a little while, or if you do, be really careful. >> this is what i find fascinating. i could have it and give it to other people and not even know it. >> exactly. some people have this virus, b
correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us with more. >> this will really be interesting to see what they find here because nothing quite like this has ever been done. in essence, this is what they're thinking about doing. take 1,000 players and really follow them, look at their medical records, get measurements and look at all sorts of stuff, and then pick your 100 healthiest, and pick your 100 sickest, and then compare them, and one of the things that they will likely be looking for is how much does football have to do with it? are they sicker because they play a certain position or because they played for a longer period of time and talking about current players and former players and so this is something that's been negotiated and talked about. the nfl says nothing is more important than the health and safety of their players and if you're really into this, cnnhealth.com my colleague stephanie smith has a wonderful article. >> i was talking to two nfl players yesterday about concussions and one of them is going to donate his brain to science in essence and he said it's difficult to know exactly
of beverly hills talked about staking her dog jiggy to andy cohen's show "watch what happens live." >> jiggy was slurping from -- ice cube from a vodka tonic. >> andy cohen is a bad influence. >> jiggy was so jilled, he would fall asleep. >> he looks little hung over. >> jiggy is more of a social drinker whereas cleo drank for medicinal purposes. sometimes the only thing that helps is a little hair of the dog. thanks for watching. that does it for us. "early start" begins now. >>> america on ice. from the midwest to mid-atlantic, subzero cold causes misery and takes more li lives. >>> the right to fight. for the first time the pentagon will allow women in combat on the front lines. >> that's huge news. >>> a defiant north korea threatening more nuclear tests and calling the u.s. its sworn enemy. that breaking overnight. good morning, everyone. welcome to "early start," i'm john berman. >> and i'm zoraida sambolin. thursday, january 24th, 5:00 a.m. in the east. let's get started here. up first if you are still wrapped up in your blankets you may want to stay right where you are. >> do not mov
to the clinton administration when president clinton invited william cohen, a republican to be defense secretary. then the obama administration, president obama asked robert gates, a republican to be defense secretary. then there was leon panetta. and now another republican, chuck hagel. what's wrong with democrats being defense secretary? >> right. actually, just as an historical footnote, roberts used to be a republican. you know, i think that there's a sort of feeling that each one of these can be justified. i think president clinton and cohen had a good relationship, as does president obama and senator hagel. in gates' instance, that made a lot of sense. so much was going on that you didn't want to have an immediate change in the defense. but that is true, that it looks like democrats always want to appoint republican secretaries of defense. also if you look at the history of the independent councils, they have almost all been republicans. and as a democrat i sometimes get frustrated, too. we can't find an independent council in our own party. i can understand the frustration but the preside
of state -- at leas for now. massachusetts governor patrick naming william cohen, his former chief of staff to the crary of state submitted his resignation last night. microsoft founder bill gates speaking out about immigration. we'll hear from him next. campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. [ male announcer ] sounds good. can youlyric can.aid do this? lyric can. lyric can. lyric by phonak is the world's only 24/7, 100% invisible hearing device. it's tiny. but that might be the least revolutionary thing about lyric. lyric can be worn 24/7 for up to four months, without battery changes. call 1-800-414-5999 for a risk-free trial. cookie: there's absolutely no way anyone can see it even if they get right up to my ear. michael: wake up, go to sleep...showering, running, all your activities. lyric can also give you exceptionally clear, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your heari
, like when william cohen. can you compare when william cohen was nominated as a republican by a democratic president as opposed to senator hagel? >> we've heard republicans say that chuck hagel ceased being a republican several years ago. they were concerned when he voted against -- remember, he voted against the iraq surge. he was against it. he differed from the bush administration on a number of things and i think a lot of republicans feel that he sort of left the party a while back. >> brian: jennifer griffin at the white house for a very good reason. news secretary of defense is going to be nominated today. thanks. >> gretchen: another controversial issue was general mccrystal. remember over in afghanistan he was leading the charge there and he gave an interview to the rolling stone magazine. in that, there were many revelations about how he felt about president obama and his administration. subsequently, mccrystal did resign. >> brian: i will say this, he was never quoted, criticizing the administration. others were saying that's how he felt. but he never blamed anybo
the political buzz saws are out again. like hagel, william cohen was a republican senator before he was bill clinton's secretary of defense. >> i think he will face the same challenge in terms of people on the democratic side saying, hey, wait. we've got some pretty talented people that could step in at a moment's notice and fill that spot. and the republicans will say, why are you helping out a democratic administration? >> reporter: one key republican already is challenging hagel. >> i am concerned about many of the comments that he made and has made, like reference to, quote, jewish lobby, which i don't believe exists. i believe a pro-israel lobby exists. >> reporter: other insist hagel is not anti-israel. >> he belongs to a tough-minded, in this case, republican view of israel that, in fact, accepts the reality that while the united states and israel are very close allies and will remain close allies, their views on every issue cannot be expected to coincide. >> reporter: critics in the gay and lesbian community have turned around their opposition to hagel. in 1998, hagel opposed james h
. >> and in dollars retirement in california vs. an oregon is a big difference. >> the dreamline. cohen is getting a bit wet for this one. boeing is having a big problem with this one. >> they introduced this a couple of years ago it was said to be enjoyable heading into a payment systems and very comfortable. it is still having hiccups' but any great innovation does. it takes time to get them out. it will be a premier a jet for the next 30 years. i like the innovation leaders today we sought apple did cremated. well boeing get hearurt their plan recall is lingering. i cannot say. >> we have it your question. your thoughts on american airlines' bankruptcy stock, a a m r q. at $1.30 it set?. >> my thought is i do my homework. any company that goes into bankruptcy they wipe out the common shareholder 99 percent of the timing issue new stock. it is going to zero is my guess is my historical analysis. do your homework. bankruptcy owners get crushed debt holders get what ever is their first and then employes will get the middle. i do not think there is much more common stock. >> what should i do with s
double arm transplants. want to bring in elizabeth cohen. i love stories like this. it's like wow. >> amazing. >> to see that guy smile and say i'm hopeful when he looks at the other arm, maybe this other arm will work well. how did they do this? >> get to one why arm is doing better than the other arm. it may have to do with where the transplants took place. on the right one it was actually above, so the new arm is -- it was here, it was from here down. the other one from somewhere around here down. the more arm you have to transplant the more difficult time somebody's going to have. so that's an important thing to remember. so the more arm you have to transplant, the more difficult the recovery's going to be because these doctors are putting together tendons, muscles, nerves, blood vessels. really tiny surgery. they practiced on cadavers first which i thought was fascinating. trained surgeons, they practiced on cadavers first. >> is it possible that -- he's hopeful, the second arm, is it possible he will have full functioning arms at some point? >> he may not have full functioni
of weeks. >> elizabeth cohen, thank you for that. appreciate it. >> thank you for bringing my home medical history on tv it was great. >> well, you shared it. it was really nasty too, folks. >> it was bad enough the first time. now we share it with america. >>> top trends on cnn.com. a murder mystery that turned washington, d.c. upside down. 2001. it was nuts. i was there. a brand new development in the chandra levy murder case. defense attorneys want a retrial. prosecutors withheld important information about a witness. we don't know which witness was involved, but defense attorneys say the government already had the information during the trial. 30-year-old ingmar guandice is serving a 60-year sentence after being convicted of murder. >>> crocodiles on the loose? are we going to see them. it's in south africa. some 1,500 crocodiles escaped from a reptile farm after it was flooded. half have been recaptured. one was located 75 miles away on a high school rugby field. one of the country's largest river, and now there are apparently a lot. >> a crocodile outbreak in south africa. >>> first
. wolf. >> elizabeth cohen with that report, thank you. >>> we can guarantee a harbaugh will coach the winning team in the super bowl. one of the best stories in the super bowl, even if the two coaches don't want to talk about it we're all having such a great year in the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. 'cause all our states are great. and now is when the gulf gets even better. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride or just lay in the sun. enjoy the wildlife and natural beauty. and don't forget our amazing seafood. so come to the gulf, you'll have a great time. especially in alabama. you mean mississippi. that's florida. say louisiana or there's no dessert. brought to you by bp and all of us who call the gulf home. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in tot
correspondent elizabeth cohen is in texas, one of the hardest hit states. >> reporter: wolf, kids are especially vulnerable to the flu. and parents need to be really vigilant. i spent the day yesterday with one mom who got her son help in the nick of time. >> reporter: darius is so sick with the flu, he's in the hospital. he could've died if not for the quick thinking of his mother. she was keeping a close eye on her son at home. he didn't seem all that sick, then suddenly wednesday night -- >> he couldn't hard breathe. he was, you know, gasping for, you know, breath and that was real scary because i thought he was going to pass out at any minute. >> she immediately brought her 7-year-old son to the emergency room. by the time they got there, darius was incoherent. >> how did you feel in your heart when your own son didn't know who you are? >> you don't want to think the worst, but as a parent, you can't help it, you know. >> the flu had struck darius hard. his asthma making it even worse. doctors had to give him oxygen. he's recovering here at cook children's hospital in ft. worth, texas. so be
more than i need. >> yeah, but most vitamins -- >> i know, the excess washes away. >> right. the cohen ziems and the reaction that you need there for the reaction, but you only need the amounts that you need for it to happen. anything over and above that is superfluous. and it goes out in your pee. so i'm not saying you shouldn't be able to make money with it. in fact, there have been some people who have made a lot of money. herb greenberg has a great documentary, which i watched yesterday online. >> he's focusing on herbalife, which is perfect for him. >> he's been working on it a long time. he's dug into interviews, he's -- was the bottom line? what is the lead for herb's piece spp. >> the question becomes is it a upon zee scheme or not? he talks to the company, he talks to some of the distributors who have had complaints, say that they got drawn into it. in fact, the last quote is from a woman who says this is not what i signed up for. >> do the products help anyone? >> i didn't dig into that. that part was not brought up in these 20 minutes. >> what's the biggest products? >> i do
. is this what america wants? joining us for debate is stephan haste and sally cohen. he had also use big words. sit along by him on "special report." do you think that president obama is trying to undo reagan's legacy? we heard him talk so much about reagan when he was running for president, how much he looked up to him what did had on his mind something like where president reagan. president obama could make liberalism safe for america. could spread the gospel progressive values just as president reagan did with conservatism. i think it's working. to the extent that he is committed to doing it i think it's working. we remain a center right country. >> charles, do you agree with charles krauthammer and stephan hayes? this seems to be the moofl president obama is making or was it there all along. >> i'm confused as to which ronald reagan we are talking about. ronald reagan was the guy who gave amnesty to millions of undocumented immigrants. raise taxes 11 times. and supported the brady gun violence bill. so there is is that ronald reagan. then there is the ronald reagan sort of fictional ronald
senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen. what did doctors find in this new study? >> this is fascinating. doctors autopsied hundreds of men. they found the ones who were on beta blockers, very common blood pressure medications, had fewer signs of alzheimer's in their brains. fewer lesions. less atrophy. they think it might possibly be because it's good for the brain to have lower blood pressure. it sort of takes some of the stress off the brain. maybe that's why they had those findings. >> so explain exactly what a beta blocker is. does it mean people should routinely be taking beta blockers if they suspect they could come down with dementia or alzheimer's down the road? >> beta blockers block the effect of adrenaline which is what helps bring your blood pressure down. doctors said absolutely not, you should not be on a beta blocker unless you need it. if you don't need the beta blocker, it might cause your more medical problems then you started out with. now, if you do have high blood pressure, you can ask your doctor, hey, i'd like to start on a beta blocker, le
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)